Turtle Bunbury

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JOSEPH DREW OF GLASGOW & NORTH AMERICA

THIS INFORMATION COURTESY OF Sandra Keirstead Thorne (Hampton, New Brunswick, Canada)

"Joseph Drew was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1742. His baptism has been found in Scottish records as being 1 August 1742. His parents were Joseph and Christian (Bryce) Drew.

In his Loyalist claim dated 11 January 1787 at Saint John, New Brunswick he swore that "he is a native of Scotland, settled in America near 20 years ago - at the time of the Troubles was settled at Ninety Six. Joined Colonel Innes as soon as he arrived. Served under Colonels Cotton and Hamilton, continuing chiefly in the Garrison with the Ninety Six Militia. Was in Colonel Ferguson's Expedition - came to Halifax from Charlestown, now settled on Belleisle Bay.

Property - had 100 acres on Half Way Swamp. Produces Grant to claimant of 100 acres on Half Way Swamp dated in 1774 - hard cleared 15 acres, built a house and barn. Had 5 horses, 6 cattle, 30 hogs, farming utensils, wheat, oats and corn. Was also possessed of another estate in Georgia. Ten years before the War claimant had been settled in Sunbury [near Savanah]. Purchased a town lot there of Samuel James for 35 guineas - gave him a negroe wench for it. The Deed was made to his daughter and it has not been disposed of. Was possessed of five years before he went to Ninety Six - used to let it for 8 pounds per annum sterling - received three years rent before he left it, there was a pretty good house, well repaired. He had the Deed of Conveyance to Samuel James which he left with Colonel Mason.

Colonel Hamilton certifies to claimant's loyalty and to his serving, and that he had lands in Ninety Six District.

Witness Mary Drew sworn - saith that she is daughter to claimant, remembers her father and mother coming from Sunbury in Georgia when they came to Ninety Six District, understood they had an house and lot there. Remembers her father going up to Augusta to receive rent for the house and lot at Sunbury - remembers his going two or three times. Has heard the House of Samuel James as the person of whom it was bought."

1790

Edgefield District Land Deed Book 2 page 107-108

Oct. 14, 1790

Letters of Attorney: Joseph Drew of Kingston in Kings County & Province of New Brunswick, to William ANDERSON, Esq. of 96 Dist, SC Letters of Attorney to sell 150 acres on North prong of HALFWAY SWAMP bounded NE by Paul Trapen, SE by John Edwards & SW by Joseph Thomas.

Witness: Conrelius Nice, Mary Hamilton

Providence (sic) of New Brunswick, Kings County

In various issues of the Georgia Gazette dated 1768 there are references to Joseph Drew . An example of one from the Georgia Gazette of Wednesday January 17, 1770 reads as follows "Joseph Drew from Great Britain, takes this method to acquaint the public that he intends to carry on the Taylor Business in all its branches, in a house of Mrs. Cunningham's near the Filature where gentlemen and others who may be pleased to employ him may depend on having their orders punctually executed. An apprentice is wanted to said business."

In 1774 Joseph Drew was petitioning for land in the Ninety Six District of South Carolina. He received land as follows:

1) Pursuant to a warrant to me and directed by John Brennan Esq., Dep. Lan. Gt. having the first day of May 1773 I have admeasured and layed out to Joseph Drew a plantation or tract of land containing one hundred acres situated and located in Colliton County in the Ninety Six District, the waters of Handleys Creek and the waters of Cuffeetown Creek, butting and bounding to the N. W.l on Roger McKenneys land, to the S.W. on Parsons and Rutledges land and to the N.W. by Deborau Pendergraphes land and on all other sides by vacant land and hath such shapes and marks as a plat above dath represent. Certified for the 15th of May 1773 - David Cunningham.

2) South Carolina - Pursuant to a warrant by the Hon. Wm Bull, Esq. to me directed by John Brennan, Esq. Dep. Lan. Gt. having date May 10th, 1773 I have admeasured and layed out unto Joseph Drew a tract of land containing one hundred and fifty acres on the north prong of Half Way Swamp in the Ninety Six District bounded N.E. by Paul Tropers land, S. E. of John Edwards land, S.W. by Joseph Thomas land and part vacant, all other sides by vacant land and hath such marks and shapes as the above plat represents. Surveyed 10th May 1773 William Anderson, D.S.

More work would need to be done in the South Carolina Land Records to see just which tracts of land Joseph received, whether he had sold any of it and which was the 100 acres on Half Way Swamp he claimed in his Loyalist petition of 1787 - Audit Office claim 12/49/378-380.

In another petition, recorded in Palmer's "Biographical Sketches of Loyalists in the American Revolution (1984) and in his Audit Office claim 12/49/375 and 12/109/130 Joseph Drew stated that he immigrated to America about 1767 and settled first at Sunbury, Georgia; he later moved to the Ninety Six District, South Carolina where he had 100 acres on Half Way Swamp. He served in the garrison with the 96 Militia and was in Colonel Ferguson's expedition. Drew settled after the war at Belleisle Bay, NB. The father of six children in 1787, he estimated his loss at 162 pounds sterling and was awarded 93 pounds sterling.

In her Loyalists in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War (1981), Murtie June Clark states that "To accomplish the subjugation of the frontier and to maintain a stable base for northern operations, it was necessary for the British to re-establish the Loyal Militia, as a domestic force, under the direction of a few regular troops, and to recruit another class of the militia to act outside the Carolinas with the regular army. Around the port of Charleston and the town of Orangeburg a Loyal Militia was established under local leadership and according to guidelines given by Sir Henry Clinton. But along the frontier which extended from Virginia to Georgia, it was a different matter. To establish the militia, Clinton appointed Major Patrick Ferguson as Inspector of the Militia and Major Commandant of the first battalion of militia to be raised in South Carolina. Ferguson held the rank of brevet lieutenant-colonel and major of the 71st Highland Regiment." (p. xiii)

Ferguson was defeated in October 1780 at Kings Mountain, Francis Marion was campaigning against British Loyalists in the low country of South Carolina and Thomas Sumter maneuvered his patriot forces against loyalist targets in the South Carolina upcountry. In addition, Nathaniel Greene, the new commander of American forces in the south, had split his army to move more widely through the Carolinas. Greene set siege to Ninety Six in May 1781 but never took the fort. He was forced to lift the siege a month later as British reinforcements advanced toward Ninety Six. The British abandoned Ninety Six in July and moved to the coast. This signaled the end of British control of the interior of South Carolina. The Southern Campaign was over. British forces surrendered at Yorktown four months later, effectively ending the war.

From pay abstracts the service of Joseph Drew in the South Carolina Militia is apparent. He first appears as a private in the period 14 June - 13 December 1780 in Col. John Cotton's Regiment. He continued to serve, always as a Private, right through until the end of December of 1782, at which time he had arrived in Nova Scotia.

In a memorial to Thomas Carleton, Govenor in Chief of the Province of New Brunswick, dated at St. John, 20 January, 1785 the hardships of the South Carolina Loyalists of the "back country" were detailed.

The Memorial of Christopher Rubart and David Bleakney, in behalf of themselves and others, humbly sheweth: [NB - I also descend from David Bleakney - S]

"That your Memorialists, late inhabitants of South Carolina, were ever zealously attached to His Majesty, and the British Constitution and used every effort of promote the good of His Majesty, whereby they became so obnoxious to the Rebels as to render their continuance in that Province impossible. That your Memorialists being residence of the back part of the Province (one hundred and fifty miles from Charlestown) and acting in conjunction almost at all times with the troops then stationed there, they had neither time or opportunity of securing or bringing off any part of their property when the frontier posts were evacuated, and were obliged to accompany the troops leaving their families behind at their plantations, but who were soon driven after them, deprived of every necessity except a part of their cloathing. That your Memorialists continued at Charlestown and performed Militia duty until the beginning of November 1782, when they embarked for Halifax, where they arrived the 21st of the same month. That they were obliged to continue there during the winter, as the then commanding officer of the troops would not order more provisions to be issued to them than one week at a time which obliged their continuing there, having no other means of subsisting themselves and their distressed families. That their united request, Colonel Hamilton of the Militia (under whose direction they were) went to New York at the beginning of 1783 and solicited his Excellency, the then Commander in Chief, for a further supply of provisions to be issued at one time and some cloathing. His Excellency with that humanity and goodness peculiar to him was pleased to grant the same, and soon after Colonel Hamilton's return to Halifax, the provision was issued and the cloathing and some farming utensils were sent to the care of Roger Johnson, Esq., Asst. Comissary General to be held at Col. Hamilton's.

Your Memorialists had concluded on coming to this place and the cloathing arring the day they sailed rendered the distribution of it impractible, but Col. Hamilton left a written requisition with Mr. Johnson begging that he would receive and keep the same in store until his return from St. John's which would be in four or five weeks when a distribution thereof should be made, that some days before his return to Halifax, some of the Carolinians who remained there, through repeated importunities, to Governor Parr, had procured an order from him to Mr. Johnson for the delivery of the cloathing which was put in the hands of a person who made an improper use or distribution of it, whereby your Memorialists with their families have been totally deprived of their quota.

That Colonel Hamilton petitioned Governor Parr praying that an equivalent might be allowed. His Excellency's answer was that he was very sorry that it had happened but that it was then out of his power to order them any supply of the kind, having not any under his direction.

Your Memorialists therefore humbly pray that your Excellency will be pleased to take their distressed situation, and that of their families, who are nearly destitute of cloathing, into your humane consideration, and afford them such relief as to your Excellency's goodness and wisdom may seem meet, and in duty bound, they will ever pray.

I do certify that the facts related in the foregoing Memorial are strictly true, and that the undernamed with their families have not received any cloathing from Government since their arrival in Halifax in November 1782 and that they are in great distress, some of their children being nearly destitute of cloathing, viz:

There follows a list of the South Carolina Loyalists who moved to New Brunswick, most of whom had land grants on the shores of the Belleisle Bay, among them is Joseph Drew with a wife and five children.

The memorial was signed by John I. Hamilton, late Colonel, R. M. S. C.

As a Loyalist to Saint John, Joseph Drew obtained a Parrtown (later Saint John) lot #576 on the north side of Princess Street east in 1784. These lots were 100 by 40 feet. Mary, widow of Joseph, sold that lot for 15 pounds to Thomas Morris Cromwell on 28 October 1814. Joseph also obtained land grants up the St John River on both sides of Belleisle Bay in Kings County. These were 1/2 of lot #26 (approximately 100 acres) on the North side of the bay which he shared with Thomas Walker, another South Carolina Loyalist and 1/2 of lot #6 on the South side of the bay which he shared with Elizabeth McCrea.

In 1797 Joseph and wife Mary sold his half of lot #6 to James Maphett and that same year they sold his half of lot #26 to his son-in-law, Martin Reicker. In February of 1797 Joseph bought 200 acres, all of lot #9 from William and Mary Kearney. This lot would become his farm.

Joseph seemed to have lived at times on this farm and at other times in his house on his Saint John lot. In 1790 his daughter, Elizabeth, married Luke Keirstead and settled at Kingston, Kings County, NB. This marriage took place at Trinity Anglican Church in Saint John. In 1802 he, as a tailor, became a freeman of the City of Saint John.

On 11 April 1808 Joseph Drew made his will. It was registered on 6 May 1808 when Joseph is referred to a "deceased". In his will he said he was a tailor. He left his wife, Mary, his lot on Princess Street, his farm lot #9 on the Belleisle he left split between his sons, John and James and to his daughters, not named in his will, he left his blessing and requested them to live in peace and love.

Mary Drew died 7 December 1818 aged 72. To date, no place of burial has been found for Joseph and Mary Drew but it was probably in the Loyalist Burial Ground in the centre of the city of Saint John.

In his petition of 1785 Joseph stated he had five children, in a petition of 1787 six children. Apart from children identified there may have been a daughter, Jemimah who married Robert Helmsley although no further information is available on her."

Time line of life of Joseph Drew

 

JOSEPH DREW

 

Parents – Joseph and Christian (Bryce) Drew

Born ca 1742 – baptized 01 August 1742 Glasgow, Scotland

Died between 11 April 1808 and 21 April 1808 Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Wife – Mary – maiden name unknown

Born ca 1746

Died 15 December 1818 Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

1767 – Arrived in America – according to his Loyalist petition

1767 – birth of daughter Mary [in 1851 census she stated she was born in USA]. Does this indicate Joseph and Mary were married prior to arrival in Georgia – probably.

1769 – purchased town lot in Sunbury, Georgia from Samuel James/Jeanes. Samuel Jeanes owned lots 105, 127 and 128 according to the town plan of Sunbury. The land record for this transaction is in Book U – 343. Book U 19 April 1769-21 December 1769. In his Loyalist petition , 11 January 1787, Joseph Drew said that he “purchased a town lot there of Samuel James for 35 guineas – gave him a negroe wench for it. The Deed was made to his daughter and it has not been disposed of. Was possessed of it five years before he went to Ninety-Six – used to let it for 8 pounds per annum sterling – received three years rent before he left it, there was a pretty good house, well repaired. He had the Deed of Conveyance to Samuel James which he left with Colonel Mason.”

1770 – The Georgia Gazette Wednesday 17 January 1770 an advertisement appeared in which “Joseph Drew, from Great Britain, takes this method to acquaint the publick that he intends to carry on the TAYLOR BUSINESS in all its branches, in a house of Mrs. Cunningham’s near the Filature, where gentlemen and others who may be pleased to employ him may depend on having their orders punctually executed. An apprentice is wanted to said business.”

Was this in Sunbury or in Savannah?

1771 – birth of daughter Elizabeth

1773 – birth of daughter Christiana

1773 – petitioned for and received a grant of 100 acres in Colliton County in Ninety-Six District on the waters of Cuffeetown Creek, South Carolina.

1774 – birth of son John

1774 – petitioned for and received a grant to 100 acres, Half Way Swamp, Ninety-Six District, South Carolina.

1774-1778 – birth of son James (or he was born prior to Mary – no trace of him in 1851 census in New Brunswick therefore no age available – possibly deceased or returned to USA or to Scotland?)

1778-1779 – Joseph Drew on the list of Petit-Jurymen for the Ninety-Six District, near 96 Court House.

1780 – 1782 - Served from 14 June 1780 in the Stevens Creek Militia, he evacuated Fort Ninety-Six in July 1781. Joseph Drew stated that he ‘joined Colonel Innes as soon as he arrived [at Ninety-Six], continuing chiefly in the Garrison with the Ninety-Six Militia. Was in Colonel Ferguson’s expedition…” Booby Gilmer Moss in his The Loyalists at Kings Mountain Joseph Drew is not mentioned as having been at that battle with Colonel Patrick Ferguson. However, Colonel John Cotton commanded one of the seven regiments under Colonel Ferguson. The pay abstract Nr 4, Colonel John Cotton’s Regiment, indicates that he was with Lieut Colonel John H. Crugger at Orangeburgh, SC from 14 June – 13 Dec 1780. After the summer of 1781and into the autumn of 1782 Joseph Drew was paid as a member of the Ninety Six Brigade at Charlestown.

1782 – 21 November – South Carolina Loyalists, under Colonel John Hamilton, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia from Charleston, South Carolina. Some sources give ship as the Argo.

1783 – Joseph Drew and his family and other South Carolina Loyalists spent a miserable winter in Halifax, and according to their petition “that they were obliged to continue there during the winter, as the then commanding officer of the troops would not order more provisions to be issued to them than one week at a time which obliged their continuing there, having no other means of subsisting themselves and their distressed families.”

Colonel Hamilton went to New York to plead for a further supply of provisions which missed Joseph Drew and some of the other South Carolina Loyalists because the supplies arrived on the day they sailed from Halifax to Saint John.

1784 – Joseph Drew obtained a Parrtown (later Saint John) lot #576 on the north side of Princess Street, east. He also obtained land grants up the St. John River on both sides of Belleisle Bay in Kings County. These were ½ if lot #26 (approximately 100 acres) on the north side of the bay which he shared with Thomas Walker, another South Carolina Loyalist, and ½ of lot #6 on the south side of the bay which he shared with Elizabeth McCrea.

1802 – Joseph Drew made a Freeman of the City of Saint John – occupation – tailor

1808 – 11 April – Joseph Drew made his will

1808 – 21 April The Times or True Brtion newspaper mentioned the death of Joseph Drew at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

1818 – 15 December – death of Mary Drew at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

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