Turtle Bunbury

Writer and Historian

 
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HISTORY

HOUSE HISTORY

 

Above: Turtle Bunbury presents a slideshow on Corkagh's early history, Clondalkin, 2016.

CORKAGH

Clondalkin, County Dublin, Ireland
The Life & Times of a South Dublin Demesne 1650-1960

 

Extracts from the following appear in the book ‘CORKAGH - The Life & Times of a South Dublin Demesne 1650-1960’ by Turtle Bunbury, published by South Dublin County Council in May 2018. The County Library in Tallaght have the books as part of their Local Studies collection; readers can either visit the Library or contact them via 01 4597834.

 

Chapters

1. Corkagh in the 17th Century - see below.

2. The Chaigneau Family

3. Nicholas Grueber & the Gunpowder Mills

4. The Chenevix Family.

5. General De Grangues

6. Theophilus Desbrisay

7. The Arabin Family

8. Finlay: Scotland to Corkagh

9. Colley: Tudors, Explorers, Rally Drivers



*****


The Corkagh demesne has been in existence, in one guise or another, since at least 1326 when it was listed as part of the Archbishop of Dublin’s manor of Clondalkin.[i] A modest castle existed here in the medieval age followed by a farmhouse constructed in about 1650. During the turbulent seventeenth century both house and lands passed through a series of families such as Mills, Trundell and Browne before they were settled upon the Nottinghams, kinsmen of the prominent Jacobite dynasty of Sarsfield. Following the collapse of the Jacobite army in 1691, Peter Nottingham was exiled and stripped of his lands.


In 1703 Lewis Chaigneau, a French Huguenot émigré, bought 104 acres of the forfeited Nottingham estate at Corkagh, thus setting in motion a deep and long-lasting link between Corkagh and Ireland’s Huguenot community. This presumably explains why the surveyor Peter Duff was commissioned to create a rather crude vellum map of Clondalkin in 1703, although a quality version of his map seems to be elusive. According to one account, this map shows a road bisecting the Corkagh estate, running parallel to the Naas Road. It was labelled on Duff’s map as The Green Road from Newcastle to Dublin; in Corkagh Estate itself, it passes the front of Kilmatead House running towards St. John's Road.[ii]

Chaigneau is also credited with building Corkagh House, incorporating the earlier farmhouse and almost certainly using stones from the medieval castle. During Chaigneau’s day, the gunpowder mills were established at Corkagh by Nicholas Grueber, another French Huguenot, whose family were probably the most influential gunpowder manufacturers in Britain or Ireland at that time.

The gunpowder mills played a central role in Corkagh’s evolution during the eighteenth century, particularly under the ownership of Colonel Philip Chenevix, Grueber’s nephew, who was a senior British Army officer with friends in high places. The Huguenot connection also continued - not just with Chenevix, whose family hailed from Lorraine, but also through General Henry De Grangues, an immensely wealthy army veteran and friend of King George II who briefly lived at Corkagh, as well as the charismatic Desbrisay family who also owned land at Corkagh during this period.

Upon the death of Chenevix’s son and heir, ownership of the gunpowder mills passed to the Arabin family, long-standing military comrades and kinsmen of the Chenevix’s, whose origins were likewise rooted in the Wars of Religion that tore France apart in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Despite a litany of accidental explosions and harsh import duties imposed by Britain, the mills continued to operate through into the 1820s.

In November 1750 David Chaigneau, son of Lewis, auctioned the mansion at Corkagh in a Dublin coffee house. The buyer was Thomas Finlay, a banker of Scottish ancestry who had been cutting a dash on Dublin’s City Assembly for some time. Finlay belonged to an intricate network of merchants and bankers operating at the heart of the Irish capital. He was almost certainly helped by his cousin Sir Robert Finlay who owned most of the iron export and mining industries in Sweden at this time. Corkagh was to serve as the Finlay family’s primary base for most of the next two centuries, although they also initially retained a Dublin townhouse beside their bank on Ormond Quay.

Thomas Finlay’s son Colonel John Finlay was a member of the last Irish Parliament but arguably made a greater impact commanding the Dublin militia as they marched south through the Wicklow Mountains to crush the United Irishmen in Wexford during the 1798 Rising. Five years later Colonel Finlay was also closely embroiled with Robert Emmett’s Rising during which his close friend Arthur Wolfe, Lord Kilwarden, was murdered.

The bank of Finlay & Company, which had moved north to Jervis Street at the close of the eighteenth century, ceased operating on the watch of Colonel Finlay’s son Thomas. During his tenure Corkagh was leased out to William Stockley, the operator of a horse bazaar on Dublin’s Baggot Street. Mr Stockley was declared bankrupt in January 1837 but would later serve as President of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.

In June 1837, the Rev. John William Finlay, eldest son of Thomas, married the daughter of a prominent London brewing family who gave him six children before her premature death. His second wife was one of the Hamiltons of Hamwood, County Meath. The Rev. Finlay was living at Corkagh by 1860 and perhaps earlier. When he died in 1879, the house passed to his only son Colonel Henry Thomas Finlay who led the 5th Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers to South Africa during the Anglo-Boer War. He appears to have rented the house out at certain points – the celebrated military commander Earl Roberts had designs on it, while Baron de Freyne took it for the 1896 hunting season.

The Finlay line came to a sad demise with the death of all three of Colonel H. T. Finlay’s sons in war – Harry in the Anglo-Boer War, Bobby and George on the Western Front during the Great War. My connection to Corkagh stems from their eldest surviving sister Edith Maud, known as Edie, who married George Colley. I have a very faint recollection of meeting Edie when I was a small boy, shortly before her death aged 94 in 1975. In our family, Edie was known as Baba; she was my grandmother’s mother.

When Edie moved back into Corkagh with her young family in 1915, she introduced a fascinating new dynasty to the property. Boasting of close connections to both the Dukes of Wellington and the Viscounts Harberton, the Colleys had been in Ireland since the early Tudor Age. George Colley’s siblings included Florence (mother of the writer Elizabeth Bowen), Gertrude (great-grandmother to the actors Ralph and Joseph Fiennes), Constance (a pioneering female doctor), Gerald (who was greatly embroiled in the Easter Rising) and Eddie (an acclaimed land surveyor who went down on the Titanic).

Upon the death of her father in 1936, Edie succeeded to Corkagh. Her husband George Colley had passed away three years earlier. After about thirteen years at the helm, she passed Corkagh to her eldest son Dudley, a motor racing devotee, who found some success running the Corkagh Dairies during the 1930s and 1940s. After Dudley Colley’s premature demise in 1959, the house that his ancestor had purchased over two hundred years earlier was sold, with 248 acres, to John Galvin. The following year the venerable mansion was felled. Dublin County Council would go on to acquire 468 acres of the Corkagh lands in 1983.

This history explores the lives of the miscellaneous families who lived at Corkagh between the seventeenth century and the end of the Colley era in 1959.

Turtle Bunbury, Spring 2018

 

CORKAGH IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

RALPH MILLS

In October 1641 an uprising by the Catholic population in Ulster led to the massacre of thousands of Protestant settlers. As Ireland plunged into an eleven-year internecine war, Clondalkin was among the villages that fell to the rebels. In January 1642 a troop of horse rode out from Dublin and all but destroyed the village. Six months later Sir William Parsons, Lord Justice of Ireland, advocated the demolition of the nearby castle of Deansrath ‘to ease the town and to help to free the country.’[iii] The Irish Confederate Wars, as this era became known, culminated in a comprehensive victory for Oliver Cromwell and his New Model Army.

At the time of the Confederate Wars, Corkagh appears to have belonged to a Catholic by name of Ralph Mills. He was one of eighty-two men from the Barony of Newcastle and Uppercross who appeared on a list of ‘Papist Proprietors’ published between 1654 and 1656. This list was part of a Civil Survey of lands forfeited by Catholic and Royalist rebels following Cromwell’s conquest. Their lands were subsequently transferred into Protestant ownership under the terms of the Acts of Settlement passed by Cromwell’s Parliament in 1652.

It is not known how great a role Ralph Mills played in events prior to 1654 but many of those named alongside him were key supporters of the Catholic Confederation, including members of the Sarsfield, Talbot, Eustace and Barnewall families. Some were subsequently restored to their lands by Charles II but it is unknown what became of Mills.

WILLIAM TRUNDELL

At the time of the Restoration in 1660 the lands at Corkagh were registered to William Trundell, a man whose origins and fate are every bit as puzzling as Ralph Mills. The Dublin historian F. Elrington Ball ranked him as one of the seven ‘principal persons’ connected with the parish of Clondalkin.[iv] Despite this, he is not listed in a record of Adventurers from the period. Nor does his name appear as a Titulado (title-holder) for the Barony of Newcastle and Uppercross in the 1659 census.[v] It would be pleasing to prove a connection between him and John Trundell, or Trundle, the London bookseller who co-published the first edition of Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’ in 1603.[vi]

In 1666, King Charles II’s brother James, Duke of York (later James II) ‘passed patent’ for the Eustace estates in the Clondalkin and Rathcoole areas, including 41 plantation acres in Corkagh.[vii]

ALDERMAN JOHN CARBERRY

The Down Survey carried out by William Petty in 1655-1656 and now held by Trinity College Dublin also shows Alderman John Carbery as owner of land at Corkagh, as well as at Kilbride (Rathbride) and Collinstown. Francis Carberry occupied Baldonnell Castle in Kilbride at the time of the Restoration. There had been a Sheriff of Dublin by name of John Carbery in 1635. Alderman Carberry lived at Grace Dieu, which is assumed to be the former Augustinian abbey at Lusk, the stones of which went into the construction of Turvey House for the Barnewall family. Alderman Carberry’s daughter Margaret married Mathew Barnewall, another Dublin alderman, who was killed in the Siege of Derry, where he was a captain in King James Irish Army, on August 12, 1690. The Barnewall family seat, Archerstown in County Meath, was forfeited. Mathew and Margaret’s son John "Tuscarora Jack" Barnwell was part of the Wild Geese, landing in Charles Town in the Colony of Carolina in 1701.[viii]

STEPHEN BROWNE

In May1703 a gentleman named Stephen Browne commissioned the Dublin-based surveyor Peter Duffy to survey his lands at Clondalkin, including a section of Corkagh.[ix] This was almost certainly Stephen Fitzwilliam Browne whose grandfather Thomas Browne, a Catholic Dublin barrister, had snapped up a large chunk of property in the area during the land shake-ups of Charles II’s reign. This included the forfeited Eustace estate of Clongowes Wood, or ‘Castle Browne’ as he named it.

The historian F. Elrington Ball notes: ‘A house which stood in that century close to the ruined castle in Clondalkin village, and which bore the date 1714, and a heraldic device with a buck's head as the crest, a displayed eagle as the arms, and "virtus omnia coronat" as the motto, was probably erected by the Browne family, who still owned property in the parish.’ [x]

CAPTAIN PETER NOTTINGHAM

When the French Huguenot merchant Lewis Chaigneau acquired 104 acres of Corkagh in 1703, it is believed that at least some of this had been forfeited by Captain Peter Nottingham, a former Confederate officer in the Duke of Ormonde's army. Originally from England, the Nottinghams moved to Dublin during the early years of the Anglo-Norman conquest and prospered in the city. Robert Nottingham, a highly influential merchant, was Mayor of Dublin City seven times between 1309 and 1322.

During the 1650s, Peter’s father Limrick (or Lamerick) Nottingham was dispossessed of his lands at Ballyowen Castle in Lucan, presumably for having supported the Confederacy. Ralph Mills of Corkagh was listed alongside him but, unlike Mills, Limrick Nottingham was restored by Charles II. Limrick’s first wife was a sister of Patrick Sarsfield, Earl of Lucan, hero of the Siege of Limerick, as well as of William Sarsfield, the enterprising owner of Lucan Castle. Peter’s mother - Limrick’s second wife - was a sister of a prosperous Dublin vintner, Robert Ussher of Crumlin. After the failure of James II’s army to defeat William of Orange, the Nottingham family forfeited their lands, including Ballyowen, which passed to Colonel Thomas Bellew, later MP for Mullingar.

 

FOOTNOTES

[i] McNeill, Charles (ed). Calendar of Archbishop Alen's register c. 1172-1534 (Dublin: Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 1950.)

[ii] Ask About Ireland. Further details of Peter Duff are at http://eprints.maynoothuniversity.ie/2568/1/Thesis_CD.pdf

[iii] Ball, Francis Elrington, ‘A History of the County Dublin’ (Alex. Thom & Company Limited, Abbey-St., 1906), p. 117.

[iv] Ball, F Elrington, ‘A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century’, p. 118.

[v] Michael C. O'Laughlin, ‘County Dublin Ireland, Genealogy and Family History Notes from the Irish Archives’ (Irish Roots Cafe, 2008), p. C-6.

[vi] Veronica Palmer, ‘Who's Who in Shakespeare's England’ (Palgrave Macmillan, 1999), p. 253.

[vii] John D'Alton, ‘The History of the County of Dublin’, p. 731.

[viii] Ball, F. Elrington The Judges in Ireland 1221–1921 John Murray London 1926

With thanks to Nolene Dowdall.

[ix] "Photostat" copy of a map of severall parcells of land in and near the towne of Clondalkin, Barrony of Uppercross, Co. Dublin. Surveyed by order of Mr Browne by Peter Duffy, May, 1703.

[x] Ball, F Elrington, ‘A History of the County Dublin’, p. 118.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

With manifold thanks to the following for assistance both great and small, yet vital in equal measure.

· Kevin Akers

· Shirley Arabin

· Richard Bomford

· Ally Bunbury

· Dr David Butler

· Emma Coburn, Surrey Archaeological Society

· Petra Coffey

· Finlay Colley

· David Cotter

· Alan & Glenys Crocker

· Alistair Crocker

· Rosaleen Dwyer, Heritage Officer, South Dublin County Council

· Harry Everad

· Alex Findlater

· Roger Finlay

· Kieran Groeger

· James J Hackett.

· David Hasslacher

· Rebecca Hayes

· Christopher and Mary Hone

· Paul Horan

· Danielle Joyce (Archive Assistant, Cheltenham College)

· Laetitia Lefroy

· Major Robin W B Maclean TD (Curator) and (Assistant Curator), The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards Museum, Edinburgh.

· Ralph McGarry

· Brida Mulligan

· Jane Munro, Keeper, Paintings, Drawings and Prints, The Fitzwilliam Museum

· Rev. James Mustard

· Isabella Rose Nolan

· Maria O’Brien

· David Power

· Jessica Rathdonnell

· Charles Richards (The Mendicity Institution)

· Glen Thomas

 

FOOTNOTES

 

[i] McNeill, Charles (ed). Calendar of Archbishop Alen's register c. 1172-1534; Prepared and Edited from the Original in the Registry of the United Dioceses of Dublin and Glendalough and Kildare; with an index compiled by Liam Price. Dublin: Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 1950.

[ii] Ball, Francis Elrington, ‘A History of the County Dublin’ (Alex. Thom & Company Limited, Abbey-St., 1906), p. 117.

[iii] The identity of Ralph Mills remains unknown. There was a Ralph Mills living at Shipton-upon-Mower in Co. Worcester in 1649 – Depositions of witnesses taken at the dwelling house of Ralph Mills in Shipton upon Mower, co. Worcester. 22 March 1649 [1649/50], via ‘Descendants of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut, Volume 1, 2nd Edition, by Barbara Jean Mathews, (Lulu.com, 2013), p. 144.

“A List of the Papist Proprietors names in the County of Dublin, as they are returned in the Civil Survey of the said County,’ transcribed by Michael C. O'Laughlin in ‘County Dublin Ireland, Genealogy and Family History Notes from the Irish Archives: Including Dublin City and County’ (Irish Roots Cafe, 2008), p. H-4.

Also named on this list is Limrick Nottingham of Ballyowen. However, on 1 February 1661, the newly restored King Charles II wrote to the Lords Justices from Whitehall:

“We have granted letters for restoring Sir Henry Talbot, Sir Wm. Dungan, Limrick Nottingham, Henry Rochford, Sir Richard Barnewall and others to the estates of their ancestors. Some of these, being in the cos. Dublin and Kildare, are in the hands of John Blackwell or his assigns. Blackwell shall receive compensation in lands according to our Declaration of November 30, 1659, either in Dublin in compensation for his lands in Dublin or in Kildare, or in the barony or Yromakillie [Imokilly] co. Cork, for his lands in Kildare. P. J. S.P. Dom. Signet Office IV., 228. Quoted in ‘Calendar of the state papers relating to Ireland preserved in the Public Record Office. 1625-[1670], edited by Mahaffy, Robert Pentland (H. M. Stationery Off., by Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1905), p. 204.

[iv] “During the Commonwealth the principal persons connected with the parish were John Foy at Clondalkin, and William Greene at Nangor, and after the Restoration we find besides Sir John Cole at Newlands, Anthony Wynne at Ballymount, John Lyons at Fox-and-Geese, John Harvey at Ballycheevers, and William Trundell at Corkagh.” Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin:: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 118.

[v] See list of Adventurers at https://books.google.ie/books?id=PXWo7Ic0SLIC&pg=PA333&dq=clondalkin+1660&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAmoVChMIuZj2iMaryAIVhbgaCh3kKAaT#v=onepage&q=Trundle&f=false

[vi] Michael C. O'Laughlin in ‘County Dublin Ireland, Genealogy and Family History Notes from the Irish Archives: Including Dublin City and County’ (Irish Roots Cafe, 2008), p. C-6. John Foy, or Foye, who was closely involved with Clondalkin at this time, is among the names listed.

[vii] Veronica Palmer, Who's Who in Shakespeare's England: Over 700 Concise Biographies of Shakespeare's Contemporaries, (Palgrave Macmillan, 1999), p. 253. There was also a bookseller called John Trundell based in Paris in 1636. A man by name of John Trundle was expelled from the church for non-Conformity in 1607, having previously been a lecturer at Christ Church Newgate. (See ‘The Puritan Lectureships’, p. 29.

“This ancient English surname of TRUNDLE was a locational name meaning 'one who came from TRENDLE' a thithing in the parish of Pitminster, County Somerset. The Norfolk TRUNDLES are descended from the TRENDLE family in that county, found there as early as 1360. The earliest of the name on record appears to be Thomas TRENDYL, who was the vicar of Wilton, County Norfolk in the year 1360, and John TRYNDELL was the rector of Wimbotsham, County Norfolk in 1569. Later instances of the name include Thomas TRENDLE, who was the vicar of Mendham, County Norfolk in 1631, and William TRUNDEL was documented in Hetherset, County Norfolk in 1639. Laurence Allison and Judith TRUNDLE were married at St. George's, Hanover Square, London in the year 1733.”

In a list of “Rectors of the consolidated medieties of Hethersete, and church of Cantelose” it is noted that in 1639, Edward Mitchell ‘had it of the gift of William Gostlin of Norwich and William Trundel, Gent, patrons of the turn.’ Francis Blomefield & Charles Parkin, An essay towards a topographical history of the county of Norfolk (1806), p. 28.

Could he have been connected to the William Trundle, ‘a wealthy farmer [who] died at Rotherhithe in the 100th year of his age’ As the European Magazine put it, ‘it is remarkable he had lived in the same house 82 years and seen a complete change of all the inhabitants in his parish.’ The European Magazine: And London Review, Volume 9, p. 472.

[viii] John D'Alton, The History of the County of Dublin, p. 731.

[ix] "Photostat" copy of a map of severall parcells of land in and near the towne of Clondalkin, Barrony of Uppercross, Co. Dublin. Surveyed by order of Mr Browne by Peter Duffy, May, 1703.

[x] Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin:: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 118.

[xi] Tessa Violet Murdoch, 'The Quiet conquest: the Huguenots 1685-1985’ (Museum of London , 1985), p. 103.

[xii] Another account says the Chaigneau family were originally from St. Sairenne or St Savinien in the Charante. [Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman, Donald N. Yates, 'Jews and Muslims in British Colonial America: A Genealogical History' (McFarland, 2012), p. 151

[xiii] According to the Rev. Samuel Hayman, ‘The Huguenot settlers in Youghal appear to have established themselves in that town immediately after the accession of the Prince of Orange. The Corporation, now thoroughly Protestant, warmly welcomed the fugitives; and among its records appears an order, dated in 1697, “That Protestant refugees might be enfranchised on payment of sixpence; but that they should not vote for seven years, nor be qualified until then to serve as Church wardens.” As was the case everywhere, the new settlers brought with them industry, intelligence and, in some instances, considerable wealth; and the towns that threw open their franchise to them were largely benefitted by the spirit of enterprise their presence soon created.” Hayman also notes that the Huguenots who settled in Youghal were “mostly military persons”. Rev. Samuel Hayman, The French Settlers in Ireland No 4 - The Settlement at Youghal County Cork, Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Volume 2, p. 223-224.

[xiv] The Huguenots: Their Settlements, Churches, and Industries in England and Ireland, Samuel Smiles (J. Murray, 1867), p. 203.

[xv] Joe Devine (p. 7) records how historian Liam Ua Broin believes Corkagh House ‘once stood within the moat of a castle. The said castle ruins consisted of an arched entrance, part of a battlemented parapet and eight windows.’ (Devine, p. 80).

[xvi] Agnew, David Carnegie, ‘Protestant Exiles from France, Chiefly in the Reign of Louis XIV: Or, The Huguenot Refugees and Their Descendants in Great Britain and Ireland’, Volume 2 (A. Turnbull & Spears, 1886), p. 513.

[xvii] Hubert Butler, In The Land of Nod, Dublin 1966, p. 18, provides much detail on the Gowran connection.

[xviii] William Tighe’s Statistical Survey of Kilkenny, quoted in Hubert Butler, In The Land of Nod, Dublin 1966, p. 18.

[xix] Hubert Butler, In The Land of Nod, Dublin 1966, p. 18, provides much detail on the Gowran connection.

[xx] Lewis's brother Stephen, who died in 1705, married Mademoiselle Raboteau, the cousin of a prosperous Dublin-based wine merchant, and had two sons, Peter (whose sons John and Abraham were 'considerable merchants' in Dublin) and Daniel (who left no descendants). Lewis's younger brother Isaac is thought to have been father to the David Chaigneau who was minister of the French Church in Carlow in 1744. More details on these and other branches of the Chaigneau family can be found Grace Lawless Lee, The Huguenot Settlements in Ireland (Heritage Books, 2009), p. 72-73. See also remarks on Colonel William Chaigneau. There is a record from 1745 of a ‘Mariage de Josias Chaigneau et de Marguerite Castaing, veuve de Moïse Garraud.’ In other words, Margeurite was a widow. Inventaire Sommaire - Charente-Inférieure, Archives Départementales, Antérieures A 1790. Rédigé Par M. Meschinet De Richemond, Archiviste, (La Rochelle, 1903), p. 34.

[xxi] David Carnegie Agnew, author of ‘Protestant Exiles from France, Chiefly in the Reign of Louis XIV: Or, The Huguenot Refugees and Their Descendants in Great Britain and Ireland’, Volume 2 (A. Turnbull & Spears, 1886), p. 419, claims that Elizabeth, daughter of Colonel Renouward (sic), was the wife of David Chauigneau but Grace Lawless Lee holds firm that David’s wife was Elizabeth Maquarrel. It is notable that a Midshipman David Renouard took part in HMS Pandora’s search for the Bounty mutineers.

[xxii] The will of Lewis Chaigneau, dated 16 July 1723, Reg. of Deeds.

[xxiii] Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 119. Falkiner, who owned property at Terenure, was a son-in-law of Joseph Budden, one of the Commissioners for the sale of forfeited estates, who had also purchased land in the parish of Clondalkin, including Nangor Castle.

[xxiv] Registry of Deeds Index Project - Memorial No: 76327. With huge thanks to Richard Bomford for helping to decipher what this was about. A lease and release deed meant that the land was leased on one day to put Mr. Desbusay in legal occupation of the land for a finite period (usually a year), and then re-leased (leased again) on the following day to put him in possession for ever (usually expressed as a lease for the lives of three named people, but with the lease renewable forever meaning that when each named person died, they could be replaced by another 'life', often on payment of a fee to the original seller). Deeds of lease and release were the closest thing to freehold, and in about 1900 it evolved into freehold in Ireland as we know it today.

[xxv] Usually the earlier deed would be recorded in the Registry too, but not if it predated the Registry. There is no cross reference here, so maybe the earlier deed is not recorded separately in the Registry in this case, just referred to in the current deed.

[xxvi] Based at 33 Dorset Street, Dublin, Charles Meares, "an attorney of great eminence, and for several years pursuivant of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer in Dublin", was father to John Meares (c. 1756 – 1809), a navigator, explorer, and maritime fur trader, best known for his role in the Nootka Crisis, which brought Britain and Spain to the brink of war.

[xxvii] “The Registry of Deeds did not keep the original deed as its two parts were retained by the seller and the purchaser. However, an extract was written into the Registry's legers and was known as the 'memorial' of the deed. It too had to be signed and witnessed as a true record of the original deed. The lawyer who witnessed the original deed also witnessed the memorial … The memorial was made on 26 April, i.e. two days after the deed was executed, which is pretty quick going: sometimes deeds were registered years after they were executed. The had to be registered before they could be relied on legally, so they would sometimes only be registered when the land was next to be sold. In this case, the new owner has wasted no time in getting his ownership registered.” – Richard Bomford.

[xxviii] Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 119.

EXTRACTS FROM THE OLD VESTRY BOOKS OF CLONDALKIN.

James Digges LATOUCHE and Elizabeth CHAIGNEAU were married by his Grace ye Archbishop of Dublin on the 7th day of April, 1735.

Thomas HASSARD and Henrietta CHAIGNEAU were married by his Excellency the Lord Primate on ye fourth day of May, 1743 by virtue of a licence from ye Consistorial Court of Dublin directed to me.

Francis WILSON, Vicar of Clondalkin.

(Clondalkin Parish - Extracts from Parish Registers, Copyright 2007, Ireland Genealogy Project Archives, contributed by C.Hunt and Carol Hughes).

[xxix] Michael McGinley, ‘The La Touche Family in Ireland’ (The La Touche Legacy Committee, 2004), p. 49-51.

[xxx] Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (1944), Volume 74, Part 4, p. 217.

[xxxi] Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Volume 2, (Ulster Archaeological Society, 1854), p. 225.

[xxxii] ‘There is a listing of all visible tombstones in St. Mary’s [but] no mention of the Chaigneaus! However the word “visible” is important because there is also a database of burials which lists two of them - David and Elizabeth. In the record of tombs, there is a reference to a couple with an unknown surname - David Ch******* and Elizabeth - the rest is unreadable. The tombstone is located inside the entrance to the Boyle chapel on the South side but inside the Boyle Chapel.Everyone coming in or out has to walk on it so the writing is pretty unreadable.’ Thanks to Kieran Groeger.

[xxxiii] Henry Chaigneau, A Dictionary of Irish Artists, 1913.

[xxxiv] Mary Ann is stated by Hayman and Wagner to have married Mr. Simon Green in Youghal in the year of her father's death, ie 1753, but according to Agnew she became Mrs. Pratt. Perhaps she married twice. See: Agnew, David Carnegie, ‘Protestant Exiles from France, Chiefly in the Reign of Louis XIV: Or, The Huguenot Refugees and Their Descendants in Great Britain and Ireland’, Volume 2 (A. Turnbull & Spears, 1886), p. 419.

[xxxv] David Carnegie Andrew Agnew, 'Protestant exiles from France in the reign of Louis XIV; or, the Huguenot refugees & their descendants in Great Britain & Ireland' (Volume 1), p. 37.

[xxxvi] Dictionary of National Biography; Faversham Gunpowder Personnel Register 1573-1840
(Faversham Society's Faversham Papers).

[xxxvii] Crocker, A. G., ‘Gunpowder Mills: Documents of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries’, Surrey Record Society, 2000, p. 81-82.

[xxxviii] Nicholas’s elder brother Francis Grueber was born in Lyons, probably in December 1658. Between 1691 and 1693 he served as a deacon of the French church in Threadneedle Street; he was an elder between 1705 and 1708 and after 1713. Francis also dabbled in the grain trade at Faversham port. After 1700, Grueber seems to have focused on gunpowder, his mills employing other Huguenot refugees living in Faversham. He would later have mills at Oare and Chilworth also. The Gruebers lived at 8 Preston Street in Faversham. See Dictionary of National Biography; Faversham Gunpowder Personnel Register 1573-1840 (Faversham Papers) plus London Immigrants.

[xxxix] Crocker (2000), p. 81-82.

[xl] Nicholas married Marguerite on 19 May 1703. In 1707 he took a 41-year lease of a house on Ormond Quay. Their youngest son is thought to have been the Rev. Dr. Arthur Grueber D.D., sometime headmaster of the Royal School in Armagh. See Crocker (2000), p. 81-82.

[xli] Christine Casey, ‘Dublin: The City Within the Grand and Royal Canals and the Circular Road with the Phoenix Park’ (Yale University Press, 2005), p. 111.

[xlii] The boy was thirteen year old Francis Greuber whose father and namesake would later be buried alongside him in Faversham. Dictionary of National Biography; Faversham Gunpowder Personnel Register 1573-1840
(Faversham Society's Faversham Papers).

[xliii] The Political State of Great Britain, Volume 14, (London, Sept 1717), p. 267.

[xliv] The Post Man & the Historical Account, Oct 19-22, 1717.

[xlv] In England, Coram and Grueber paid £22 3d for a purpose built cart, with 6d going to the shoemaker ‘for sewing leather over the iron across the cart’ to prevent sparks from the wheel hitting the powder. Gillian Wagner, ‘Thomas Coram, Gent., 1668-1751’ (Boydell & Brewer, 2004), p. 69.

[xlvi] Crocker (2000), p. 81-82.

[xlvii] The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Volumes 86-87 (1956), p. 47. The Corkagh works probably had edge-runner incorporating mills from the start in 1719 (Crocker & Fairclough 1998, 28-9).

[xlviii] His name is spelled as Nicholas Gruther in The Historical Register, Volume 9, p. 135.

[xlix] ‘There is said to have been up to seven mills operating along the river at its peak.’ (Rynne, C. 2006 Industrial Ireland 1750-1930. Cork. Collins Press, p. 290).However John D’Alton suggests there were actually nine mills in ‘The History of the County of Dublin’, p. 719.. See also ‘Appendix D’, p. 17 - The Archaeological Impact Assessment reports by Valerie J. Keeley Archaeologists.

[l] Guy Miege, ‘The present state of Great Britain and Ireland’(J. Brotherton, 1738), p. 89-90, via

[li] Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 119; Dublin Evening Post, Nov. 24-27, 1733.

[lii] Crocker (2000), p. 81-82.

[liii] Coram’s role may have been providing and managing ships and powder barges to transport the sulphur and saltpetre to Grueber’s mills. Coram’s assistance paid off Greuber’s debts but he died aged 71 in April 1730. After Grueber's death, the business stayed in the family until the Ordnance Board bought it in 1759. See: Gillian Wagner, ‘Thomas Coram, Gent., 1668-1751’ (Boydell & Brewer, 2004), p. 69; K. R. Fairclough called 'Thomas Coram: his brief career as a gunpowder producer' from Vol. 86 (1999) Surrey Archaeological Collections, p. 53-72; Dictionary of National Biography; Faversham Gunpowder Personnel Register 1573-1840. (Faversham Society's Faversham Papers).

[liv] David C. A. Agnew, 'Protestant Exiles from France in the Reign of Louis XIV: Or, The Huguenot Refugees and Their Descendants in Great Britain and Ireland’ (private circulation, 1866), p. 360.

[lv] Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 29, Issue 1, p. 68. See also Boubers family tree.

[lvi] Agnew, Volume 1, p. 37.

[lvii] ‘Philippe de Chenevix, ministre de Limay, proche Mantes, dont un fils était garde du roi d'Angleterre, et dont une fille était dans la tour de Londres avec la duchesse de Montmouth. Un autre de ses enfants restait à Paris chez son cousin Monginot.’ "La révocation de l'Édit de Nantes a Paris d'après des documents inédits".

[lviii] Ruth Clark, ‘Sir William Trumbull in Paris', Cambridge University Press, 1938, p. 96.

[lix] Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 29, Issue 1, p. 68; New General Index To The Proceedings & Quarto Series of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain & Ireland 1885–2007. Edited by Dorothy North The Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland London 2011.

[lx] Charles Dalton, English Army Lists and Commission Registers, 1661-1714 (Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1896), Volume 3, p. 19, states that he was a Brigadier and eldest lieutenant in troop commanded by Lord Lumley.

[lxi] Allegations for Marriage Licences Issued by the Vicar-general of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Volume 31, Harleian Society, 1890, p. 273.

[lxii] The Manuscripts of the House of Lords, H.M. Stationery Office, 1697.

[lxiii] Also spelled as ‘Windham’s Horse’, the regiment later became the 6th Dragoon Guards, before evolving into the 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales's Dragoon Guards). Journals of the House of Commons, Volume 13, p. 440.

[lxiv] Born in 1649, Wyndham was the second son of Colonel Francis Wyndham and Anne Gerard. He distinguished himself at the Boyne, and at the siege of Limerick. He died a bachelor in 1706, at Valencia in Spain, possibly from wounds.

[lxv] Stephen Wood, 'Those Terrible Grey Horses: An Illustrated History of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards' (Osprey Publishing, 2015) p.20.

[lxvi] Ibid., p. 21,

[lxvii] David Carnegie Andrew Agnew, 'Protestant Exiles from France in the Reign of Louis XIV: Or, The Huguenot Refugees and Their Descendants in Great Britain and Ireland' (Volume 3).

[lxviii] Saul David, ‘All The King's Men: The British Soldier from the Restoration to Waterloo’ (Penguin UK, 2012).

[lxix] Charles Dalton, ‘The Blenheim Roll, 1704’ (Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1899). In 1704, “A Petition of Susannah Chenevix and Mary Paine on behalf of themselves and many other Widows of Officers who were killed in the late Engagements at Donazcert and Hockstet was presented to the House [of Commons] and read, setting forth that the Petitioners Husbands, having received from the Government several Debentures for their Pay, charged the Petitioners not to part with them, till they were made as good as Money, which they soon expected, the Parliament having enacted to make them good the next Session after the 24th of June 1703; That their Husbands supported their Families by Returns from Holland, and they still have the Debentures, but cannot any longer subsist, without disposing of them, which are now at a very great Discount: And praying the House to make Provision for Payment of the Principal and Interest due on the said Debentures. Ordered: That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House who are to consider further of the Supply granted to her Majesty.

The figure is also given by Stephen Wood on page 21.

[lxx] Samuel Shellabarger, ‘Lord Chesterfield and His World’, Biblo & Tannen Publishers, 1951, p. 122.

[lxxi] Another example of the Bishop stepping in to save money came in Chesterfield's letters of Nov 21 1769 “The Archbishop of Cashel tells me that by your indefatigable endeavours you have recovered near twenty thousand pounds for the several defrauded charities.’(Melesina Chenevix St. George Trench, ‘The Remains of the Late Mrs. Richard Trench’, (Parker, Son, and Bourn, 1862), p. 9.

[lxxii] See Appendix 1. Melesina Chenevix St. George Trench, ‘The Remains of the Late Mrs. Richard Trench’, (Parker, Son, and Bourn, 1862).

[lxxiii] The concept that Paul Daniel Chenevix was a brother is pitched in the Yale edition of Horace Walpole's correspondence, Volumes 13-14 (Yale University Press, 1948), p. 103.

[lxxv] Cathy Hartley, A Historical Dictionary of British Women, (Routledge, 2013), p. 97.

[lxxvi] A List of the Colonels, Lieutenant Colonels, Majors, Captains, Lieutenants, and Ensigns of His Majesty's Forces on the British Establishment (T. Cox, 1740), p. 64.

[lxxvii] Stephen Wood, ‘Those Terrible Grey Horses: An Illustrated History of the Royal Scots’.

[lxxviii] A List of the Colonels, Lieutenant Colonels, Majors, Captains, Lieutenants, and Ensigns of His Majesty's Forces on the British Establishment (T. Cox, 1740), p. 64.

[lxxix] Registry of Deeds Index, Memorial No: 76327.

[lxxx] Miscellaneous Works of the Late Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield’ (E. and C. Dilly, 1779), p. 354.

[lxxxi] Stephen Wood, ‘Those Terrible Grey Horses: An Illustrated History of the Royal Scots’.

[lxxxii] Pue’s Occurrences, 20-23 November 1756.

[lxxxiii] Owen Weekly Chronicle Or Universal Journal, 5 August, 1758.

[lxxxiv] Dejean died in Dublin on 29th September 1764.

[lxxxv] The Gentleman’s Magazine, Vol. 28, p. 611. Details of his will in £2,000 Mortgage Passed to Elizabeth Chenevix 13th October 1756 via Bomford.

[lxxxvi] 'Miscellaneous Works of the Late Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield’ (E. and C. Dilly, 1779), p. 354.

[lxxxvii] Stephen Wood, ‘Those Terrible Grey Horses: An Illustrated History of the Royal Scots’.

[lxxxviii] Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 29, Issue 1, p. 68.

[lxxxix] Treasury Warrants: August 1717, 11-12, p 507-544, Calendar of Treasury Books, Volume 31, 1717. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1960. See also Cambon’s Regiment.

[xc] See his will at http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D631910

[xci] See Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London, 1941, p. 420.

[xcii] Walker's Hibernian Magazine, Or, Compendium of Entertaining Knowledge, Volume 2 (1772), p. 624.

[xciii] Registers of the French Conformed Churches of St. Patrick and St. Mary, Dublin, Huguenot Society of London, 1893, p. 55.

[xciv] 'The quarters of the army in Ireland in 1749, To which is added, An exact list of the general and field officers, as they take rank in his majesty's army' (1752).

[xcv] The Gentleman's and London Magazine: Or Monthly Chronologer, 1751. Lord Sackville’s Dragoons served at the battle of Minden in 1759 and defeated Household troops led by Prince Xavier of Saxony, brother of the French Queen. See p. 210.

[xcvi] Lepper and Crossle’s records of the Grand Lodge Officers in Dublin suggest he was actually appointed a captain in the 14th Light Dragoons where Louis Dejean was commander but I am pretty sure he would have been a Carabinier until his transfer to the new Royal Irish Artillery.

[xcvii] The marriage was recorded by Pue’s Occurrences on 16 October 1756.

6.10.1 £2,000 Mortgage Passed to Elizabeth Chenevix 13th October 1756 @ ‘Thomas’ Mortgage Problems 1740 – 1760’ via Bomford.

[xcviii] In 1760, after nearly five decades in Ireland, the Carabiniers were sent to bolster the British cavalry’s strength in Germany. The regiment served at the battle of Warburg in July 1760, wintered in Paderborn and spent much of 1761 skirmishing with the French in the Rhineland and Westphalia. They returned to Ireland in 1763. See: Stephen Wood, ‘Those Terrible Grey Horses: An Illustrated History of the Royal Scots’.

[xcix] The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 28.

[c] CHENEVIX – FARNHAM PAPERS (National Library of Ireland, Collection List No. 95),

MS 41,114 /17: Lease for one year from Philip Chenevix to John Carmichael of the lands of Carn, Druminiskill, Drumcanon, Mullaghmullen, Killygowan and Laheen in the barony of Tullyhunco. 1758 May 19. 1 membrane.

Assignment of mortgage from Philip Chenevix to John Carmichael secured by the lands of Carn, Druminiskill, Drumcanon, Mullaghmullen, Killygowan and Laheen in the barony of Tullyhunco, in consideration of the sum of £1,966. 1758 May 20. 11⁄2 membranes.

[ci] Upton Collection held by the Royal Irish Academy and catalogued by Martin Fagan in April 2012. RIA/Upton Papers/1 – 29. Special List/ Liosta Speisialta: A 0081.

[cii] London magazine, or Gentleman's monthly intelligencer, Volume 29, p. 164.

[ciii] ‘Any person or persons concerned in said riot and murder who within the space of three months from the date hereof, shall discover any person or persons of said regiment concerned in the above offence, and prosecute him or them to conviction, shall receive twenty guinea reward, except Lieutenant Robert Parks and Robert Dillon Mattrois. Kildare House, Jan 6th, 1762.’ Dublin Courier, 12 March 1762.

[civ] John Heron Lepper and Philip Crossle, History of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ireland, vol. I (Dublin: Lodge of Research, 1925), p. 211.

[cv] The report erroneously refers to him as Col. David Chenevix. See: Journal of the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, Volume 13, January 1768 - December 1775. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1937, p. 437.

[cvi] The London Magazine, Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer, Volume 48.

[cvii] John Heron Lepper and Philip Crossle, History of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ireland, vol. I (Dublin: Lodge of Research, 1925), p. 211.

[cviii] The Scots Magazine, Volume 38, April 1776.

[cix] Saunders Newsletter, Monday 29 April 1776.

[cx] Saunders Newsletter, 26 April 1787.

[cxi] A number of people with the Pineau surname appear in and around Dublin in the 18th and 19th centuries. Daniel Pineau was a Goldsmith. Another Daniel, perhaps a relation, was the Registrar of his Majesty’s High Court of Admiralty. Paul Pineau was a watchmaker and Peter Pineau was a solicitor. However, their connection may be no more than the fact they shared the same surname and live in Dublin.

[cxii] Jacques René de Brisay (1637-1710), Marquis de Denonville, was a devout Catholic who served as Louis XIV’s viceroy of New France (ie: French Canada) from 1685 to 1689. His governorship is remembered for the brutality with which the French suppressed rebellions the Iroquois Confederacy, not least when he organized the capture of fifty Iroquois chiefs in the midst of a parlay whom he subsequently had shipped in chains to Marseilles, France, to be used as galley slaves. The Iroquois responded with an equally violent campaign of slaughter against New France’s fledgling settler community. His successor as governor wisely returned thirteen of the surviving Iroquois chiefs and returned them to their homeland.

[cxiii] Two of the sponsors at Théophilus’s baptism were Monsieur Thomas Vergier Sieur de Robesmier and Madame Madeleine de Barrière de Boisrond, wife of René de Saint Légier de Boisrond.

[cxiv] Recollections of John O'Keefe, 1826.

[cxv] His name is erroneously spelled as ‘Theophilas Desbusay’ in the online version of the deed of 1743.

[cxvi] BUNBURY to DESBRISAY, 22 July 1743: Lease btw Thomas BUNBURY of City of Dublin Esq eldest son and heir of Thomas BUNBURY late of same City dec’d Rose BUNBURY otherwise JACKSON mother of said Thomas & widow & relict of Thomas BUNBURY dec’s Henry BUNBURY of Johnstown in Co. Carlow Esq. & Edward FOLEY of City of Dublin Gent. Of 1 pt & Thephilus DEBRISAY of said City of other part... lease & release in consid of 608 pounds...to DEBRISAY town and lands of Moygany otherwise Morgany otherwise Moygna cont. By est 140 acres in Barony of Kilkea and Moone in Co. Kildare... in presence of William BUNBURY of Lisnevagh in Co Carlow Esq. & Charles MEARES of Dublin Gent … (Jackson Memorials and Deeds Mentioning Dublin, Book 110, pg. 363, * 77934.

[cxvii] List of General and Field Officers as They Rank in the Army 1754.

[cxviii] Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A., 3 volumes: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003, volume 1, page 414.

[cxix] Simeon Boileau was a son of Charles de Boileau, Seigneur de Castelnau and Mary Magdalen Collot d'Escury

[cxx] Bill Number 2534 (1767).

[cxxi] His death is recorded in the Londonderry Journal, Wed. July 15, 1772.

[cxxii] The particulars of the Dublin Journal advertisement in 1749 and 1750 noted that ‘the Mansion House’ plus seventeen acres of gardens and meadows were leased to ‘the Hon. Major Gen. Henry De Grangues’ for £64 a year. [Dublin Journal - Contributed by Mary Heaphy]

[cxxiii] Anne de Grangues, widow of Henry Daniell de Grangues, died in 1723. See: ‘Huguenot Archives: A Further Catalogue of Material Held in the Huguenot Library - Margaret Harcourt Williams, p. 28.

[cxxiv] The De Grangues pedigree is laid out by Henry Wagner in ‘Annuaire de la noblesse de France et des maisons souveraines’, Vo. 20, at but it is difficult to determine how these names connect to Samuel Daniell or General de Grangues. See also Philip & Mabilia Daniell, ‘Biographical history of the family of Daniell or De Anyers of Cheshire, 1066-1876, comprehending the houses of Daresbury, De Bradley, and De Tabley’ (1876), p. 35.

[cxxv] He is named as John Henry “de Grangne” in the Huguenot Society of London’s Quarto series (1911), Volume 18, p.307.

[cxxvi] Huguenot Archives: A Further Catalogue of Material Held in the Huguenot Library, Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 2008, p. 28.

[cxxvii] Matthew Glozier, author of ‘Marshal Schomberg 1615-1690, "the Ablest Soldier of His Age"’ (Sussex Academic Press, 2005), he refers to three of the Duke’s aides-de-camp, namely Henri Foubert, Isaac Monceau de Meloniere and the Duke’s own grandson Charles de Sibourg (the natural son of Charles von Schomberg who succeeded as 2nd Duke). The suggestion that Henry De Grangues’ was the Duke’s ADC was printed in John Marshall’s ‘Royal Naval Biography’ (Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1831), p. 69. Henry Daniel de Grangues, marquis de Martragny, served under the Duke of Schomberg at one point. Adding to the confusion, it is sometimes said that the Duke’s ADC at the Boyne was John Arabin. Whoever the ADC was, he did not do very well because the elderly Duke was killed in the battle.

[cxxviii] See Henry Wagner’s de Grangues pedigree as laid out in ‘Annuaire de la noblesse de France et des maisons souveraines’, Vo. 20. The link may to to Samuel Daniell or General de Grangues may be through Guillaume Daniel and his wife Jane Randall, of Salisbury, England. Their second son Henri Daniel lived a while in England but returned to settle at Caen in Normandy in 1635, acquiring the fiefs of Gresons, Moult, and Grangues. To avoid a new tax imposed on non-citizens in 1640, he obtained his rights of naturalization in 1646. It appears one of his sons or grandsons became marquis de Martragny. See also Philip & Mabilia Daniell, ‘Biographical history of the family of Daniell or De Anyers of Cheshire, 1066-1876, comprehending the houses of Daresbury, De Bradley, and De Tabley’ (1876), p. 35.

[cxxix] The Manuscripts of the House of Lords , H.M. Stationery Office, p. 88, p. 90.

[cxxx] Calendar of Treasury Papers, Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1974, p. 287.

[cxxxi] Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, Volume 24 (Society for Army Historical Research., 1946),p. 49.

[cxxxii] William A Shaw, ed. (1901). "Treasury Books and Papers: February 1741". V. pp. 441–448. His commission, dated 21 January 1741, was followed by a Royal Warrant of 2 February permitting him to raise a regiment of foot of ten companies. The colonelcy of the 60th Foot, which was transferred to the Irish Establishment remained vacant until 1743 when Sir John Bruce Hope, 7th Baronet was appointed. The regiment was disbanded in 1748.

[cxxxiii] In October 1742 he took command of the 30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot, but on 1 April 1743 he took command of the 9th Dragoons.

[cxxxiv] Reynard, Frank H. (1904). Ninth (Queen's Royal) Lancers 1715–1903. William Blackwood, p. 1. In 1717, the 9th Dragoons embarked for Ballinrobe, in Ireland, and were placed on the Irish establishment

[cxxxv] The Monthly Review (Hurst, Robinson, 1842), p. 77.

[cxxxvi] On 1 November 1749 he obtained the colonelcy of the 4th Irish Horse (later 7th Dragoon Guards), from Morduant, which he retained until his decease in June 1754. The London Magazine, Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer, 1749, Volume 18, p. 529, by Isaac Kimber, Edward Kimber.

[cxxxvii] Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London - Volume 14 (1933), p. 230.

[cxxxviii] Huguenot Archives: A Further Catalogue of Material Held in the Huguenot Library (Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 2008), p. 29.

[cxxxix] Notes and Queries, 12th Series Volume II. London. 1916. pp. 152, 313; Carter, Thomas (1871). Curiosities of war and military studies: anecdotal, descriptive, and statistical. London: Groombridge & Sons. pp. 129–130. In its acknowledgment of his passing in 1754, the Scots Magazine (1754), Volume 1, noted that he was colonel of a regiment of horse and a Major General on the Irish establishment.

[cxl] Letter from Thomas Waites to Lord George Sackville, 22 June 1754, Report on the Manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville, of Drayton House, Northhamptonshire (Ardent Media,1904), p. 214.

[cxli] Letter from Thomas Waites to Lord George Sackville, 25 June 1754, Report on the Manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville, of Drayton House, Northhamptonshire (Ardent Media,1904), p. 215.

[cxlii] Letter from to Col. John Arabin to Lord George Sackville, 25 June 1754, Report on the Manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville, of Drayton House, Northhamptonshire (Ardent Media,1904), p. 215. General de Grangues will of 12 August 1754 is held by the National Archives in the UK.

[cxliii] Letter from to Col. Philip Chenevix to Lord George Sackville, 25 June 1754, Report on the Manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville, of Drayton House, (Ardent Media, 1904), p. 215.

[cxliv] The quarters of the army in Ireland in 1749.

[cxlv] Letter from to Major Pepys to Lord George Sackville, 1 August 1754, Report on the Manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville, of Drayton House, Northhamptonshire (Ardent Media,1904), p. 221.

[cxlvi] Burke's Landed Gentry of Ireland (1904), 81, and Maurice Craig, 'The account book of William Caldbeck, architect' in Design and Practice in British Architecture: Studies in architectural history presented to Howard Colvin, Architectural History 27 (1984), 421.

[cxlvii] William Caldbeck worked for Trinity College from 1686; the last payment to him while he was still alive was made on 3 January 1718. He had died by 1722 when his executors were paid £141.2s.10d. for his work on the last part of the long wall in Patrick's Well Lane. The following year 'Caldbeck & Quinn' - Thomas and Joseph Caldbeck and Francis Quinn - were paid for brick and stonework on the new library. References: The Dictionary of Irish Architects, Irish Architectural Archive. All information in this entry is from TCD muniments, MUN P/2/2, 3, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 16, 18-20, 22-7, 30, 32, 33, 36, 47, 48.

[cxlviii] As well as his lands at Moyle Park, Caldbeck appears to have owned Larch Hill, Whitechurch, Co. Dublin, and further lands at Kilmashogue and Thomas Street.

[cxlix] The Hibernian Magazine, Or, Compendium of Entertaining Knowledge, James Potts, May 1782, p. 280.

[cl] In June 1783 Caldbeck united with the other leading members of the south Dublin community to offer substantial rewards for anyone willing to come forward and testify about illicit activity in the area.

[cli] “Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 119-120.

[clii] The foundation stone bore on one side the following texts : -" Thus, saith the Lord, ye were now turned, and had done right in my sight, in proclaiming liberty every man to his neighbours." — Jer. 34. " Again shall be heard in this place the voice of joy and the voice of gladness ; Behold the day is come when I will perform the good thing which I have promised." — Jer. 33. " This land that was desolate is become like the garden of Eden, and the waste and ruined cities are become fenced and inhabited by men." — Ezekiel 36. On the opposite side were the words, "This first stone of the first volunteer powder mills in Ireland is now laid by the Right Honourable James, Earl of Charlemont, this 28th day of May, 1782." Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 120.

[cliii] Yelverton, who built Fortfield House, Terenure, a few years later, became Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer in 1783.

[cliv] The Hibernian Magazine, Or, Compendium of Entertaining Knowledge, James Potts, May 1782, p. 280.

[clv] Ibid, p. 280.

[clvi] Dublin Journal, 4 December 1784. “Gunpowder of the First Quality made by William Caldbeck, Esq, at his Mills near Clondalkin. Now selling on the lowest Terms, for Ready Money, by Francis W Warren, Linen Draper, No. 92, Grafton Street, Dublin.’

[clvii] John D'Alton, The History of the County of Dublin, p. 719. Lennox Barrow, in ‘The Round Towers of Ireland: A Study and Gazetteer’ (Academy Press, 1979), p. 82, thought the collapse of the church as claimed by Beranger was ‘unlikely’ but I am not so sure.

[clviii] Ball, F Elrington, "A History of the County Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the Earliest Times to the Close of the 18th Century, p. 119-120. As the Freeman’s Journal observed: ‘The wind being at N.N.W. when the above incident happened, all the damage that was done was between Clondalkin and the city.’

[clix] From notes taken by the Rev. C. T. McCready, Clondalkin Parish - Extracts from Parish Registers. Copyright 2007, Ireland Genealogy Project Archives, contributed by C. Hunt and Carol Hughes.

[clx] He was elected a member of the Dublin Society on 28 April 1791, his proposers being Thomas Braughall and Christmas Weekes. The Dublin Society awarded him a £40 premium for planting 10 acres under timber, 3 July 1800. He was appointed a member of the fine arts committee on 24 July 1800.

[clxii] E. McParland, James Gandon (1985), 165,204. Bryan Bolger also records his ordering work on some stables near Aungier Street in 1798. [NA/PRO Bolger MSS. 1A/58/128.

[clxiii] “The clean, fresh water of the Camac was ideal for paper making and the mill thrived. It changed hands many times over the years and in 1913 it was bought by the Becker Company who owned paper mills all over the world. Business boomed during the First World War as all British mills had switched to war production. However, after the war, the market went downhill and the mill closed in 1922. In 1936, however, it re-opened under the name 'Condalkin Paper Mill'. Business was good until general economic circumstances lead to its final closure in 1987.”

[clxiv] Saunders Newsletter, Monday 29 April 1776.

[clxv] Much of this detail was obtained from the Upton Collection held by the Royal Irish Academy and catalogued by Martin Fagan in April 2012. RIA/Upton Papers/1 – 29. Special List/ Liosta Speisialta: A 0081. See also the Bomford notes.

[clxvi] Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London - Volume 14 (1933), p. 230.

[clxvii] p. 269 of "Letters of Denization and Acts of Naturalization for Aliens in England and Ireland", Vol. XVIII, edited by William A, Shaw, Litt.D., Lymington: Printed For The Huguenot Society of London by Chas. T. King, 1911. ‘Arabine took the oaths Mar. 4. C. J. XII.,547.’ He is mentioned several times in the pages of that time, in connection to military men.

Michel Heymès, L’Église réformée de Riez (1550-1700), Annales de Haute-Provence, Bulletin de la société scientifique et littéraire des Alpes de Haute-Provence, Tome LII, n° 295, 1er semestre 1983, pages 73 à 119.

[clxviii] "Dublin and Portarlington Veterans: King William III's Huguenot Army", T.P. Le Fanu & W.H. Manchee. Publications of the Huguenot Society of London, XLII (1946): 1-72.

[clxix] Dalton's English Army Lists Commission Registers, 1661-1714 (6 vols., 1902-1904).

[clxx] The Calendar of State Papers for the Reign of William and Mary, 1-31 December 1693.

[clxxi] 1/5/1699 to pension as Capt. (Bart. d'Arabin) [WO 25/3148]

[clxxii] Huguenots in Ireland.

[clxxiii] 1536-1810 Index Prerogative Wills of Ireland by Sir Arthur Vicars. Contributed by Vynette Sage.

[clxxiv] History of the Grand Lodge of Ireland - Vol. I, p. 161.

[clxxv] Officiers huguenots français installés à Dublin - Liste tirée de "Huguenots Veterans in Dublin " par T.P. Le Fanu dans Antiquaries of Ireland (numéro 72 pages 64-70), relevée par Marcel Macaire. Il s'agit des officiers français de l'armée anglaise qui s'installèrent à Dublin après la guerre autour de 1700.

[clxxvi] Barthélémy Arabin’s daughter Elizabeth was born on 28 June 1712 and baptised two weeks later. Colonel Jacques d’Aubussargues, who had served in the Galway Horse with Barthélémy, and Elizabeth Darasus stood as godparents.

[clxxvii] 1702 pension list, No. 52, two commissions as Cornet & Capt., pension 4/-, service for 10 years in Ireland & Flanders, fortune £500 and wife's substance, supporting wife and child, able to serve, disbanded 3/1698-9.

[clxxviii] "Dublin and Portarlington Veterans: King William III's Huguenot Army", T.P. Le Fanu & W.H. Manchee. Publications of the Huguenot Society of London, XLII (1946): 1-72.

[clxxix] Will of Bartholomew Arabin of Dublin, County Dublin. 12 March 1713. PROB 11/532/151. Held by: The National Archives, Kew.

[clxxx] ‘History of the Fifty-seventh (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot 1755-1881’ (R. Bentley and Son, 1893) p. 364.

[clxxxi] Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 2008, p. 68-70. ‘In 1700 at S. Patrick's, Dublin, on 15 June, were m. Louis Bertin and Marie Perronet. And in 1794 adm'on was granted P.C.C. of the goods of Marie Perronet, late of Bloomsbury Square …’ (The Genealogist, Volume 13, Walford Dakin Selby, George Bell & Sons, 1897, p. 45).

[clxxxii] In 2010 Mealy’s offered up a lot which they described as: ‘Arabin (John) Solicitor, Dublin c. 1726 - 33. A very interesting letter book containing manuscript copies of his letters to a wide range of clients and contacts, c. 1726 - 33, 146 numbered pages, with index at front; and with a list at rear of letters not copies into this letter book.A lot of the letters are in French, which Arabin evidently spoke fluently; it appears he married a French lady name Marie or Mary Bertin. Includes a letter to his Uncle Mons. Le Brigadier de Blanzac at La Haye (21.12.1728), to Mr. Charles de Scilly (24.6.1729), Capt. Rich. Shurburgh near Coventry (23 Sept. 1729), Mr. Paul de St. Julien, South Carolina (24.11.1729), Mr. Paul de St. Julien, south Carolina (24.11.1729), etc., etc. An unusually cosmopolitan compilation Hugenot in Portarlington. Very neatly copied in a cont. folio volume bound in green vellum. As a m/ss, w.a.f. Of immense interest.

[clxxxiii] ‘History of the Fifty-seventh (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot 1755-1881’ (R. Bentley and Son, 1893) p. 364.

[clxxxiv] A List of the Colonels, Lieutenant Colonels, Majors, Captains, Lieutenants, and Ensigns of His Majesty's Forces on the British Establishment (T. Cox, 1740), p. 64.

[clxxxv] John Heron Lepper and Philip Crossle, History of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ireland, vol. I (Dublin: Lodge of Research, 1925), p. 211. See also: Ric Berman, Schism: The Battle That Forged Freemasonry, p. 37, p. 179.

[clxxxvi] Elizabeth married her first cousin Lt.-Gen. Jean Adlercron Trapaud, son of Jean Trapaud and her aunt Aimee de St. Julien. Their children were Elizabeth Adlercron, William Hargrave Adlercron and the barrister John Ladaveze Adlercron (1738-1782) of Moyglare House. In 1766 Elizabeth Adlercron married Rt. Hon. Sir Capel Molyneux, 3rd Bt., M.P. for the University of Dublin, son of Sir Thomas Molyneux, 1st Bt. of Castle Dillon, co. Armagh, and Catherine Howard. Their children included Lt.-Gen. Sir Thomas Molyneux, 5th Bt. (1766-1841) and John Molyneux (1769-1832).

[clxxxvii] The Scots Magazine, Volume 4, p. 439.

[clxxxviii] ‘History of the Fifty-seventh (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot 1755-1881’ (R. Bentley and Son, 1893) p. 364.

[clxxxix] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 33-34.

[cxc] John Arabin succeeded as lieutenant-colonel from the late Daniel Paul. The Scots Magazine, Volume 11, p. 207. Deeds from 1749 indicate that this was also the year in which he leased 66 acres of the Moyvoughley estate to Samuel and Joshua Strangeman, while 1750 saw the lease of a further 750 acres to the Mason, Medcalf, Daly and Strangeman families.

[cxci] Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, Volumes 96-99, 1979, p. 60-61.

[cxcii] ‘History of the Fifty-seventh (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot 1755-1881’ (R. Bentley and Son, 1893) p. 18. John Arabin’s death recorded in many journals of the time, such as The Gentleman's and London Magazine and also here. See also "1536-1810 Index Prerogative Wills of Ireland" by Sir Arthur Vicars, contributed by Vynette Sage.

[cxciii] History of the Grand Lodge of Ireland - Vol. I, p. 161.

[cxciv] Her death was announced St James Chronicle 1.2.1780 / 1781 of Moulsey, Surrey. See also 'Index Prerogative Wills of Ireland' by Sir Arthur Vicars. Contributed by Vynette Sage.

[cxcv] The General Index as to Twenty-seven Volumes of the London ..., Volume 19, p. 429.

[cxcvi] History of the Grand Lodge of Ireland - Vol. I, p. 161. Huguenot Archives: A Further Catalogue of Material Held in the Huguenot Library, Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 2008, p. 28.

[cxcvii] Under the terms of the marriage settlement, Judith somehow inherited a £2000 mortgage from Thomas Bomford of Clownstown, County Meath. The lands were in Meath (at Clonfad and Rattin, Baconstown and Rahinstown) and Westmeath (Inniscoffy and Oldtown). This connects to an estate of nearly 2000 acres that belonged to the Bomford family in Counties Meath and Westmeath. See ‘6.10 £2,000 Mortgage of Jacob Pechell 1750 – 1765 via Bomford.

[cxcviii] This marriage was relevant to the Bomford lands in Meath and Westmeath. The Arabin family also had land at Kilmacud in Dublin

[cxcix] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 41.

[cc] Saunders Newsletter, 9 March 1802. See also ‘1536-1810: Index Prerogative Wills of Ireland’ by Sir Arthur Vicars, contributed by Vynette Sage.

[cci] General William John Arabin. The 23d of January, 1767, this officer was appointed to a Cornetcy in the 10th regiment of dragoons; the 25th of October, 1770, to a Lieutenancy; and the 23d of January, 1778, to a company in the 2d troop of horse guards: in which regiment he succeeded to a Majority the 23d of May, 1782. The 25th of January, 1788, he was appointed Supernumerary Lieutenant Colonel in the 2d regiment of life guards; the 26th of February, 1795, he received the rank of Colonel in the army; the 1st of January, 1798, that of Major General; the 1st of January, 1805, that of Lieutenant General; and that of General the 4th of June, 1814. This officer served with the Imperial army in Brabant; and he since received an injury in his foot whilst on duty. The Royal Military Calendar, Or Army Service and Commission Book, Volume 2, edited by John Philippart, p. 11.

[ccii] The Trial of Mrs Arabin. See also here.

[cciii] See John Venn, ‘Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students’, Volume 2, p. 65.

[cciv] Pue's Occurrences, Tues 4 July 1758. This concerned the proposed sale of various mortgaged properties, including 848 acres of profitable land in the King’s County and (‘at Ballycommon, Ballymasemurtagh, Ballyteige otherwise Ballyteign and Cloniwickvane’), as well as ‘the Towns and Lands of Rahehn and Clonfortin the County of Kildare’. For reasons as yet unclear, the Bomford lands in Meath and Westmeath that Henry’s mother Judith acquired upon her marriage in 1750 appear to have been handed on to the Sibthorpe family in 1764. See Bomford.

[ccv] Pue’s Occurrences, 29 July 1766.

[ccvi] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 44.

[ccvii] The Ballindalloch connection is given by John Marshall in ‘Royal Naval Biography’ (Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1831).

[ccviii] Thanks to Shirely Arabin – see here.

[ccix] Máire Kennedy, French books in eighteenth-century Ireland (Voltaire Foundation, 2001) , p. 61.

[ccx] The 57th Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, Ireland, Parts 1929-1930 (Stationery Office, 1936), p. 176.

[ccxi] Septimus Arabin’s story is told in detail in John Marshall, Royal Naval Biography (Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1831). Henry have been sending gunpowder to the navy via his brothers? Septimus married a daughter of the late Sir George Berriman Rumbold, Bart, formerly British Consul General at Hamburgh, whose widow was afterwards united to Sir W Sidney Smith. Septimus died at Paris in May 1826.

[ccxii] A branch of the Arabin family were still at Moyvoughly in the Parish of Ballymore in 1838 when ‘C. Arabin’ was living there.

[ccxiii] Weston St. John Joyce, ‘"The neighborhood of Dublin: its topography, antiquities and historical associations’, (M. H. Gill & Son, 1921), p. 221.

[ccxiv] John Daniell Arabin (1755-1838) became a lieutenant-general in the Royal Irish Artillery in 1814. His will is held by the National Archives in London.

[ccxv] The Charter of the Royal Canal Company, to which is prefixed a list of the subscribers. (Dublin, 1789).

[ccxvi] Peninsular Prepartion the Reform of the British Army, p. 64.

[ccxvii] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 48.

[ccxviii] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 48.

[ccxix] See here.

[ccxx] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 49.

[ccxxi] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 44.

[ccxxii] Sir Thomas Tobin renovated and expanded the Ballincolling mills, employing some 500 people in 1856. The factory supplied the market in Ireland and also had a large business in export powder for Africa, which was shipped from Liverpool. From: ‘Rise and progress of the British explosives industry’, edited by E A B Hodgetts (Whittaker, 1909), p. 363-4.

[ccxxiii] Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (1944), Volume 74, Part 4, p. 206.

[ccxxiv] John D'Alton, The History of the County of Dublin, p. 719.

[ccxxv] CSO/RP/SC/1821/77 - Letter from Henry Arabin, Dublin, concerning fears for fate of his gunpowder manufactory . Also draft copy of letter of reply from Gregory to Arabin, January 1822.

[ccxxvi] Shirley Arabin, ‘No Petty People – The Arabin Family’ (Moyglare Publishing, 2012), p. 50.

[ccxxvii] Kelleher, B, 1996 The Royal Gunpowder Mills, Ballincollig, County Cork, in Buchanan (ed) 1996, 359-75; Kelleher, G, 1993 Gunpowder to guided missiles: Ireland's war industries (Inniscarra, J F Kelleher).

[ccxxviii] See here.

[ccxxix] Dublin Weekly Register, 26 January 1850, p. 1.

[ccxxx] Dublin Evening Mail, 1 March 1850, p. 4.

[ccxxxi] Lyons, Mary C. ''Illustrated Incumbered Estates, Ireland, 1850-1905.'' Whitegate, county Clare: Ballinakella Press, 1993.

 

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